Ingress Protection Rating (IP66 and IP67)

Most of the cameras that we carry in our catalog are weatherproof, and we identify the camera’s level of tolerance to the extreme conditions with it’s Ingress Protection Rating. This “IP Code” (not to be confused with the IP address) was made to define how well devices like our IP cameras hold up against the elements, namely dust and water. In this article, we’ll go over what all of the different levels of Ingress Protection are, when to use the different IP ratings, and what varying degrees of Ingress Protection our products offer.

What do the numbers in the Ingress Protection rating mean?

The IP code always consists of two numbers after the letters “IP.” The first digit can range from 0-6, and represent the enclosure’s effectiveness at keeping out solid particulate, like dust. “0” would define something that has “No protection against contact and ingress of objects,” while the number “6” means that the enclosure allows “no ingress of dust; complete protection against contact (dust tight).” Refer to the chart below to see the full breakdown of all 7 categories defined in the first digit of an IP code.

First Digit

Level sized Effective against Description
0 No protection against contact and ingress of objects
1 >50 mm Any large surface of the body, such as the back of a hand, but no protection against deliberate contact with a body part
2 >12.5 mm Fingers or similar objects
3 >2.5 mm Tools, thick wires, etc.
4 >1 mm Most wires, slender screws, large ants etc.
5 Dust protected Ingress of dust is not entirely prevented, but it must not enter in sufficient quantity to interfere with the satisfactory operation of the equipment.
6 Dust tight No ingress of dust; complete protection against contact (dust tight). A vacuum must be applied. Test duration of up to 8 hours based on air flow.

 

The second digit in the IP code refers to it’s resistance to water. This digit can range from 0-9, where “0” means that the device is not water resistant at all, and “9” is “protected against close-range high pressure, high temperature spray downs.” The chart below has the specifics of all 10 levels of protection against harmful egress of water.

Second Digit

Level Protection against Effective against
0 None
1 Dripping water Dripping water (vertically falling drops) shall have no harmful effect on the specimen when mounted in an upright position onto a turntable and rotated at 1 RPM.
2 Dripping water when tilted at 15° Vertically dripping water shall have no harmful effect when the enclosure is tilted at an angle of 15° from its normal position. A total of four positions are tested within two axes.
3 Spraying water Water falling as a spray at any angle up to 60° from the vertical shall have no harmful effect, utilizing either: a) an oscillating fixture, or b) A spray nozzle with a counterbalanced shield. Test a) is conducted for 5 minutes, then repeated with the specimen rotated horizontally by 90° for the second 5-minute test. Test b) is conducted (with shield in place) for 5 minutes minimum.
4 Splashing of water Water splashing against the enclosure from any direction shall have no harmful effect, utilizing either: a) an oscillating fixture, or b) A spray nozzle with no shield. Test a) is conducted for 10 minutes. Test b) is conducted (without shield) for 5 minutes minimum.
5 Water jets Water projected by a nozzle (6.3 mm) against enclosure from any direction shall have no harmful effects.
6 Powerful water jets Water projected in powerful jets (12.5 mm nozzle) against the enclosure from any direction shall have no harmful effects.
6K Powerful water jets with increased pressure Water projected in powerful jets (6.3 mm nozzle) against the enclosure from any direction, under elevated pressure, shall have no harmful effects. Found in DIN 40050, and not IEC 60529.
7 Immersion, up to 1 m depth Ingress of water in harmful quantity shall not be possible when the enclosure is immersed in water under defined conditions of pressure and time (up to 1 m of submersion).
8 Immersion, 1 m or more depth The equipment is suitable for continuous immersion in water under conditions which shall be specified by the manufacturer. However, with certain types of equipment, it can mean that water can enter but only in such a manner that it produces no harmful effects. The test depth and duration is expected to be greater than the requirements for IPx7, and other environmental effects may be added, such as temperature cycling before immersion.
9 Powerful high temperature water jets Protected against close-range high pressure, high temperature spray downs. Smaller specimens rotate slowly on a turntable, from 4 specific angles. Larger specimens are mounted upright, no turntable required, and are tested freehand for at least 3 minutes at distance of 0.15–0.2 m.

 

Common Ratings And When To Use Them

All of our cameras are either IP66, IP67, or IP68 cameras. If proper weatherproofing practices are followed when the camera is installed, then the camera will stand up fine against rain, snow, and dust.

If the camera is going to be continuously drenched with water for 30 minutes or less from time to time, then you will need to go with at least an IP67 camera. An IP67 camera will perform well in situations where the camera might be splashed by waves or hit with water on a regular basis, like a carwash security system or other extremely wet environment.

While we don’t suggest it, if you have a camera that is going to be continuously submerged in water, then you would need to go with an IP68 camera. Our Exterior Vehicle IP Cameras are rated for this, in case they are installed on a boat or other marine vehicle.

 

Motion Detection In Security Cameras | When To Use It And Why Does It Suck (sometimes)?

One of the most popular features of security cameras is the ability to record only when something is happening in front of the camera. This has been the go to method for preserving that precious Hard Drive space, especially with resolutions always on the rise and with it recording storage demands. With event recording, you don’t have hours and hours of footage taking up space where nothing has happened. Up until now the most popular way of detecting an event is through motion.

How Does Motion Detection Work?

Motion detection is achieved by continuously monitoring each frame of video and averaging the background state of the scene, then if a significant portion of that scene (or percentage of pixels) changes from one frame of the video to the next, a motion event is triggered. For example, the camera is monitoring an empty hallway. Once a person enters the frame of the camera, the pixels that were of the floor and wall are now changed to the person. The camera logs a motion event and the recorder is told to begin recording. This technology was first introduced in analog security camera systems in the early-mid 2000s, but was fairly bad at giving accurate results. Unfortunately in the last decade, not much has changed.

Why Does Motion Detection Suck?

Motion detection events are still plagued with the same problems they had when they were first introduced. False positives from trees blowing in the wind, poor sensitivity, too much sensitivity, extreme shifts of lighting (i.e. a cloud moving in front of the sun), etc. have always caused this form of event detection to be less than useful. Some manufacturers have implemented the ability to exclude areas of the scene from triggering motion detection. For example, you can block out those trees that are always blowing in the wind, or the road traffic that is just visible at the edge of the parking lot. These features have helped, but never seem to work perfectly.
Another issue that needed to be solved was pre and post recording. In the early days, a motion event would occur and start recording, but you would inevitable miss the first couple seconds as the event was processed and the recorders Hard Drive spun up. Security Equipment Manufacturers solved this by building in a continuous buffer that always keeps the last few seconds or even minutes of video in memory. If a motion event occurs, the recorder knows to keep the buffered video and save it to the Hard Drive along with the footage from the point of the even on. But, even with these improvements, motion based recording still fails to be accurate enough to be useful in demanding surveillance and security applications.

So What Should I Use To Trigger Recording?

The advent of smart cameras and machine learning has opened up the market to a wide range of intelligent smart events that can be used to log and trigger many different aspects of your system. On the simple side of the spectrum, line crossing and region intrusion detection can be used in place of the relatively “dumb” motion detection. With line crossing, individual directions can be set to trigger and intrusion detection can require a certain amount of the region to be filled or that the object be present for a specified time threshold before an event is triggered. Some of the most advanced analytics include face detection, License Plate Reading and Logging, and People Counting. These advanced analytics can be used to more accurately monitor and interpret the actual events that are occurring in the surveyed area. Recording can now be triggered based on extremely specific criteria, such as if a specific license plate is detected, if there is a face seen, or if an object of significant enough size enters a specific region.

While motion detection has it’s place, it by no means is a complete or in many cases even a viable solution.

Contact an Arcdyn Sales rep today and ask about our line of smart cameras.

OEM / ODM Security Cameras | What Does It Mean and Why It Matters To Dealers.

If you’ve been in the surveillance industry for any amount of time, you have probably noticed that many of the cameras on the market look the same just with different logos on them from a myriad of different companies. The fact is that there are only a handful of companies that actually manufacture security cameras, and most security equipment wholesalers & retailers simply re-brand OEM / ODM (“Original Equipment Manufacturer” / “Original Design Manufacturer”) cameras and recorders. A good example of this from another industry would be television manufacturers. Almost every LED TV panel on the market is manufactured by either Samsung or LG. Every other brand of TV (Sony, Panasonic, Philips, Toshiba, Vizio, W/W, etc.) buys their panel from either of these two manufacturers.

In the surveillance market, there are over 50 wholesalers and retailers in the US that carry OEM Hikvision cameras and recorders, ourselves included. Our equipment is the same as the Hikvision USA branded equipment, it just doesn’t have their logo on it anywhere. Few companies are transparent about who manufactures their equipment, while most companies put their logo on the cameras and claim to be the manufacturer. Many of these same companies also choose to implement their own custom firmware to lock you into their products and prevent you from using apps or equipment from other sources. We would rather be honest and forward about where our equipment comes from and use generic firmware for ease of compatibility and to provide you the ability to use a wide variety of apps, viewing software, and equipment.

So what is the benefit of going with an OEM product, rather than a branded solution? First and foremost, you’ll get more personalized Tech Support based right here in the US. In addition to limited tech support for a lot of other brands of OEM Hikvision products if you are trying to integrate existing equipment with ours. Secondly, you can be sure that you’re avoiding “grey-market” or “China-market” equipment, which is typically what you get from sellers on open online marketplaces like Amazon, eBay, or Newegg. This equipment is generally used / outdated equipment, or is loaded with firmware that is meant for use in another country, usually China. This can cause bricking issues or incompatibility with firmware updates and usually lack any support whatsoever from the seller.

So with an OEM product from Arcdyn, you get the benefits of a reliable product with more personalized and readily available tech support. With our generic firmware you can be sure that we are as compatible as you can get with your project. Plus, we are able to brand the product for you with out any minimums or extra cost. Contact Arcdyn today to open a dealer account.

Do IP Cameras Require an Internet Connection?

We have found that a lot of people shopping for security cameras are under the impression that IP cameras require an internet connection to operate correctly, after all, it is right in the name. Though IP is an abbreviation for Internet Protocol, an IP camera system will work perfectly fine without an internet connection. You can view the cameras, record to a hard drive, and search through recorded footage using just a monitor and a mouse plugged directly into the NVR.

POE Surveillance System Layout Diagram All you need is an NVR, some IP cameras, a mouse, and a monitor to operate an IP system.

With our Carbon Series NVRs, there is a POE switch built-in, so all you need to do is plug our IP cameras directly into the back of it. The cameras will “Plug-and-Play,” so you don’t even need to access the cameras on the network during initial setup.

When you use an IP camera system without internet, you are setting up what is referred to as Closed-circuit Television, or CCTV. This is a system that involves one or more cameras that are only able to be seen on a handful private monitors. This is different from a Broadcast Television system, which is widely transmitted to a virtually unlimited number of users.

No Internet Means Limited Remote Viewing

Keep in mind that if you do not have your system plugged into a router that is connected to the internet, you cannot view your system remotely from your smartphone or PC. It would still be possible to view the system using a tablet, laptop, or mobile device using WiFi on-site if you set up a local network using a WiFi router.

How to Stream a Security Camera using RTSP & KODI on Raspberry Pi.

Overview

I wrote a previous article covering the RTSP function of Arcdyn cameras and NVR/DVRs and how to use VLC to get a viewable live stream. In this write-up, I will walk you through the process to add your camera stream into LibreELEC which is powered by KODI.

LibreELEC powered by KODI

KODI is an open source entertainment HUB that is 100% free. I’m going to use the LibreELEC version of KODI that can be easily installed on your Raspberry Pi via NOOBS. You don’t need a Raspberry PI to run KODI; it is supported Continue reading “How to Stream a Security Camera using RTSP & KODI on Raspberry Pi.”

The Cloud and Security Cameras. How To Store Your Surveillance Footage.

Cloud Security Cameras

As with everything in life, there are trade-offs when deciding where to store and how to secure your surveillance camera footage. Most options available fall into two main categories: Local Storage and Cloud Storage. In this article, I will walk you through the pros and cons of each and hopefully help in avoiding some pitfalls and misconceptions along the way. Continue reading “The Cloud and Security Cameras. How To Store Your Surveillance Footage.”

Use RTSP to view your Arcdyn security cameras in VLC Media Player

Overview

RTSP is one of the most useful things that an IP camera provides over Analog counterparts. Since the encoding is done at the camera, we can pull the RTSP stream right from the camera. NVR/DVR’s also have an RTSP Stream that can be used for live viewing the streams. This write up will cover both products. An excellent tool for testing and implementing solutions is VLC media player. It is Open Source and free to use.

Continue reading “Use RTSP to view your Arcdyn security cameras in VLC Media Player”

Varifocal Dome and Bullet Cameras – When To Use Adjustable Lens IP Cameras

A varifocal lens is an adjustable camera lens with independently adjustable focus and zoom. This is usually done using a pair of knobs or rods located near the lens of the camera. In this article, we will outline when it is beneficial to use a varifocal bullet or dome camera.


Continue reading “Varifocal Dome and Bullet Cameras – When To Use Adjustable Lens IP Cameras”

What are Smart Security Cameras and Analytics?

 

What are smart surveillance cameras?

Smart Security cameras are advanced cameras that feature a robust set of configuration tools to help secure your area. These Advanced Analytics have revolutionized traditional surveillance systems with advanced features and alerts. These features are most commonly found in IP security cameras. Different Security cameras will have different features. I am going to cover our Bolt 4k bullet camera and the smart features on that particular camera. Read the Full Article

Do Surveillance Cameras Actually Deter Criminals?

Most security professionals will say that installing surveillance cameras on the outside of your home or business is an effective method of deterring criminals from choosing you as a target. Is this just a marketing pitch to get you to buy cameras, or are there actual statistics to prove this?

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte conducted a study in 2012 that sheds light on the subject and gives us a better understanding of what is going on in a burglar’s mind when selecting a target. The University’s study, titled “Understanding Decisions to Burglarize from the Offender’s Perspective,” surveyed 422 incarcerated male and female burglars and asked them a number of questions about choosing a target, motivation for burglary, and the question that we will focus on in this article; the effectiveness of alarm and security camera systems. Continue reading “Do Surveillance Cameras Actually Deter Criminals?”

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